PNT Blog!!! - Page 9 of 63 - Professional Nutrition Therapists

Get Cooking in the Kitchen With Your Kids!

caroliretonjones National Nutrition Month, RD, recipes Leave a comment   , , , , , , ,

Meals that we make as families are often more fun to eat and get kids interested in learning about foods and cooking. Use this as an opportunity to teach your children about different types of food, different cultures, and different ways to create a healthy meal!

Maren Wolff, MS, RDN provides some ideas that are age appropriate tasks for kids in the kitchen, with adult supervision:

 Babies

While babies can’t help with the cooking, they do enjoy being in the kitchen with their parent or caregiver, and experiencing the sights, sounds, and smells that go along with cooking. Leave babies in a high chair or other safe place. Talk to them about what you’re doing in the kitchen and the foods you’re making.

Ages 2-3

  • Wiping tables
  • Scrubbing fruits & vegetables
  • Pouring liquids into a batter
  • Mixing ingredients, such as a muffin batter

Ages 4-5

  • Forming round shapes with their hands
  • Measuring ingredients
  • Beating eggs with a whisk
  • Mashing soft fruits & cooked veggies

Ages 6-8

  • Gathering ingredients & utensils
  • Light chopping
  • Breaking eggs
  • Washing dishes & putting ingredients away

Ages 9-12

  • Following a recipe & preparing simple meals & snacks
  • Use small appliances
  • Moderate chopping & dicing
  • Steaming, boiling, & baking

Teens

  • Tasks that require multiple steps
  • Planning & preparing meals
  • Making shopping lists & grocery shopping
  • Assisting younger children in the kitchen

Reference: Clemson Cooperative Extension. (2008). “Kids in the Kitchen.”

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A yummy recipe for National Nutrition Month!

caroliretonjones National Nutrition Month, PNT, recipes, Registered Dietitians Leave a comment   , , , , , , ,

Thanks Maren Wolff, MS, RDN, LD  for this delicious recipe!!

Wrap It Up Greek Salad

Try this fun twist on a traditional Greek salad in a tasty wrap! It’s a great way to take a fabulous salad on the go and mix up the routine if you’re stuck in a rut with salad for lunch everyday. To mix up this Greek salad wrap a bit more, it uses chickpeas (garbanzo beans) as the protein source.

This recipe makes a quick and easy lunch option for the week. Preparing the vegetables on the weekend makes the wraps easy to throw together in the morning before you head out the door to work or school. Enjoy!

 Recipe

Makes 6 servings

1/3 cup cucumber, finely diced

6 oz plain fat-free Greek yogurt

1 clove garlic, minced

1 bag fresh baby spinach

1 ½ cups chickpeas, cooked (or 2 – 15oz cans, drained and rinsed)

1 small red onion, diced

7 oz can sliced black olives, drained and rinsed

¾ cup reduced-fat feta cheese, crumbled

1 package Flatout flatbread (100% Stone Ground Whole Wheat)

1. Mix together cucumber, yogurt, and garlic for tzatziki.

2. Lay out one flatbread. Top with 1 cup spinach, ¼ cup chickpeas, 1 Tbsp red onion, 2 Tbsp olives, 2 Tbsp feta, and 3 Tbsp tzatziki.

3. Fold two sides of wrap towards the middle. Fold the bottom towards the middle of the wrap and continue to roll.

4. Repeat steps 2 & 3 for the remaining wraps.

Nutrition Facts

Calories: 250    Fat: 8g    Carbohydrates: 33g     Fiber: 12g      Protein: 20g

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Celebrate Registered Dietitian Day

caroliretonjones National Nutrition Month, PNT, Registered Dietitians Leave a comment   , ,

Celebrating PNTs Registered Dietitians!!

Celebrate Registered Dietitian Day on March 13, 2013

Today is Registered Dietitian Day, honoring RDs’ commitment to helping people enjoy healthy lives.

Registered dietitians are the food and nutrition experts, with the training and credentials vital for developing a personalized nutrition plan tailored for your unique nutritional needs, lifestyle and tastes. RDs can also help you manage or reduce your risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer and hypertension to name a few.

Some RDs may call themselves nutritionists, but not all nutritionists are registered dietitians. The definition and requirements for the term “nutritionist” vary. Some states have licensure laws that define the range of practice for someone using the designation “nutritionist,” but in other states, virtually anyone can call him- or herself a “nutritionist” regardless of education or training.

Individuals with the RD credential have fulfilled specific requirements, including having earned at least a bachelor’s degree (about half of RDs hold advanced degrees), completed a supervised practice program and passed a registration examination — in addition to maintaining continuing education requirements for recertification.

For more information from the most valuable and credible source of timely, science-based food and nutrition information, consult aregistered dietitian in your area and visit The Academy of Food and Nutrition’s Registered Dietitian Day or National Nutrition Month pages.

At PNT we are proud of the over 350 Registered Dietitians that work with us locally and around the country – Happy RD Day to you too!!  And to our Dietetic Technicians, Registered who work with our RDs to provide excellent nutrition care!

To reach a PNT RD call, 972-238-1811

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Healthy Spring Break Travel: Pack an Empty Water Bottle

caroliretonjones healthy eating, National Nutrition Month, PNT, Uncategorized Leave a comment  

Maren Wolff, MS, RD  provides this National Nutrition Month Tip -

Headed to the sun and sand, or the snow and ski slopes for an upcoming get-away? Try this healthy tip for your next flight.

When flying in the United States, pack an empty water bottle in your carry-on. Once you get past the security checkpoint, fill up your bottle at a water fountain. You’ll stay hydrated while you fly and save a few dollars at the airport without having to buy bottled water. If you prefer some flavor, bring some low-calorie drink mix packets from home.

Drinking plenty of fluids promotes a healthy immune system, keeps you full between meals, and helps you feel energized for when you reach your destination!

Happy & healthy traveling!

Maren sees a variety of clients and specializes in weight loss and sports nutrition – call 972-238-1811 to set up an appointment!

beach

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Mediterranean Diet helps prevent cardiovascular disease!

caroliretonjones healthy eating, National Nutrition Month, PNT, recipes, Registered Dietitians Leave a comment   , , , , , , ,

February was National Heart month to raise the awareness of heart or cardiovascular disease – however, every day our heart health is important.

What you eat can make a difference!

A new study in the New England Journal of Medicine evaluated three diet interventions on 3 groups of people – one group followed the Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil, one group followed the  Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts and finally one group followed a diet with the recommendation to reduce dietary fat.

Good news!  “Among persons at high cardiovascular risk, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts reduced the incidence of major cardiovascular events”.N Engl J Med 2013. (published on February 25, 2013, at NEJM.org.)   Compliance – or the ability to stick with the diet was good too!

A 1-liter glass bottle and bowl Bertolli brand...

So what is in the Mediterranean diet?  The emphasis is on a high intake of fruits and vegetables and whole grains, olive oil, nuts, with a moderate intake of fish and poultry.  Red meat and processed meats and foods are limited and dairy intake is moderate.  And the best – Wine in moderation, consumed with meals!

Ready to get started with a Mediterranean diet,  personalized for you?  Call us at PNT and we will work with you for a tasty, healthy and cardio-protective nutrition plan!  Call 972-238-1811.

 

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